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The Egyptians Get Rid of a Modern Day Pharaoh (July 6th, 2013)

Mohamed Morsi’s downfall

 

The following are the stages by which the Israelites journeyed up by companies from the land of Egypt under the guidance of Moses and Aaron. – (Numbers 33:1)

The biblical narrator lists 42 stopping points beginning with Egypt. Some of the mystical commentaries make a penetrating observation: The journey toward the Promised Land did not occur in one stage, but in forty-two stages.

Why did it take so many stages? They suggest the following answer: Although the Israelites had experienced physical freedom from bondage, their souls felt as though they were still enslaved to Egypt.

In reality, the slavery of the spirit is much harsher than physical slavery because its lingering effects can last at least a lifetime, if not longer.

Hassidic scholars observe that the name מִצְרַיִם “Mitzrayim” derives from the root mir, signifying “anguish,” “boundary” and “narrow place,’ e.g., “From a narrow strait, I called out unto God and He answered me with divine expansiveness” (Psalm 118:5).

According to Hegel, there is a cyclical dimension of history. We often re-experience the memories of our ancestral past in different but somewhat similar patterns.

Nearly 3000 + years later, we are witnessing a different kind of Exodus in the land of Egypt, but this time it does not involve the Israelites, it involves the Egyptians themselves.

After the Arab Spring that began in December of 2010, little did the world realize the changes that would take place in the Middle East. What characterized the “Arab Spring,” was the relatively bloodless nature of the uprisings against government that have been stable for decades.

Say what you will about Mubarak, although he was considered a tyrant by many of his enemies and foes, he kept the peace with Israel for over 42 years. That is no small accomplishment, and when he departed, the Muslim Brotherhood quickly took advantage and won the election—placing Mahammed Morsi in power.

This sympathies to Arab extremists like the Salafist, Hamas, Hezbollah, al-Qaeda and other groups were obvious to the Israelis; attacks across the Sinai quickly began, and Hamas was determined to take advantage of their man in Cairo.

But the people of Egypt deserve respect . Morsi acted like a leader who wanted to impose Shiria Law on Egypt’s largely secular society. He did nothing to better their economies; his secret police behaved no different from Mubarkak’s.

The difference between Morsi and Mubarak reminds me of an anecdote about two brothers. About 150 years ago in the wild west, there lived two brothers, who were well for their crooked business dealings and underworld connections. They acted as ruthlessly and cruelly as one might expect.. One day one of the brothers died, and the surviving brother wanted to give his dead brother a funeral fit for a king. He called the funeral home and made all the arrangements, then he called the town’s minister and made him an offer, as they say, he couldn’t refuse. He said, “I’ll give you $10,000 to put that new roof on the church if, in eulogizing my brother, you call him a saint.” Back then, $10,000 was like $200,000.

The minister agreed. The whole town turned out for the funeral, and the minister began: “The man you see in the coffin was a vile and debauched individual. He was a liar, a thief, a deceiver, a manipulator, a reprobate, and a hedonist. He destroyed the fortunes, careers, and lives of countless people in this city, some of whom are here today. This man did every dirty, rotten thing you can think of. But compared to his brother, he was a saint!”

Yes, Mubarak was bad, but now the Egyptian people realize that compared to Moris, Mubarak was a saint!

This time, the Egyptians said to Morsi, “We will expel you as our leader,” and the military got rid of him.

The synchronicity of this event is astounding—it happened on the week of the 4th of July.

When we look back at our history as Americans, we had the benefit of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and other patriots were men who not only fought a revolution –all of whom were brilliant thinkers in their own right. They articulated a passion for the public good and thought that all private interests were secondary to it.

But what about the Egyptians?

The French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau explained that every leader and government has a social contract with its people. It has to act ethically and responsibly toward the governed. Otherwise, the people have the right to dispose of their leader, for he has broken the social contract.

This is indeed, one of the most important historical moments of the modern Arab world, one that could potentially spell the end of all the Arab theocrats who wish to keep their people’s souls and minds enslaved to the 7th century.

CHULA VISTA, California — The following are the stages by which the Israelites journeyed up by companies from the land of Egypt under the guidance of Moses and Aaron. — (Numbers 33:1)

The biblical narrator lists 42 stopping points beginning with Egypt. Some of the mystical commentaries make a penetrating observation: The journey toward the Promised Land did not occur in one stage, but in forty-two stages.

Why did it take so many stages? They suggest the following answer: Although the Israelites had experienced physical freedom from bondage, their souls felt as though they were still enslaved to Egypt.

In reality, the slavery of the spirit is much harsher than physical slavery because its lingering effects can last at least a lifetime, if not longer.

Hassidic scholars observe that the name מִצְרַיִם “Mitzrayim” derives from the root mir, signifying “anguish,” “boundary” and “narrow place,’ e.g., “From a narrow strait, I called out unto God and He answered me with divine expansiveness” (Psalm 118:5).

According to Hegel, there is a cyclical dimension of history. We often re-experience the memories of our ancestral past in different but somewhat similar patterns.

Nearly 3000 + years later, we are witnessing a different kind of Exodus in the land of Egypt, but this time it does not involve the Israelites, it involves the Egyptians themselves.

After the Arab Spring that began in December of 2010, little did the world realize the changes that would take place in the Middle East. What characterized the “Arab Spring,” was the relatively bloodless nature of the uprisings against government that have been stable for decades.

Say what you will about Mubarak, although he was considered a tyrant by many of his enemies and foes, he kept the peace with Israel for over 42 years. That is no small accomplishment, and when he departed, the Muslim Brotherhood quickly took advantage and won the election—placing Mahammed Morsi in power.

This sympathies to Arab extremists like the Salafist, Hamas, Hezbollah, al-Qaeda and other groups were obvious to the Israelis; attacks across the Sinai quickly began, and Hamas was determined to take advantage of their man in Cairo.

But the people of Egypt deserve respect . Morsi acted like a leader who wanted to impose Sharia Law on Egypt’s largely secular society. He did nothing to better their economies; his secret police behaved no different from Mubarkak’s.

The difference between Morsi and Mubarak reminds me of an anecdote about two brothers. About 150 years ago in the wild west, there lived two brothers, who were well known for their crooked business dealings and underworld connections. They acted as ruthlessly and cruelly as one might expect One day one of the brothers died, and the surviving brother wanted to give his dead brother a funeral fit for a king. He called the funeral home and made all the arrangements, then he called the town’s minister and made him an offer, as they say, he couldn’t refuse. He said, “I’ll give you $10,000 to put that new roof on the church if, in eulogizing my brother, you call him a saint.” Back then, $10,000 was like $200,000.

The minister agreed. The whole town turned out for the funeral, and the minister began: “The man you see in the coffin was a vile and debauched individual. He was a liar, a thief, a deceiver, a manipulator, a reprobate, and a hedonist. He destroyed the fortunes, careers, and lives of countless people in this city, some of whom are here today. This man did every dirty, rotten thing you can think of. But compared to his brother, he was a saint!”

Yes, Mubarak was bad, but now the Egyptian people realize that compared to Moris, Mubarak was a saint!

This time, the Egyptians said to Morsi, “We will expel you as our leader,” and the military got rid of him.

The synchronicity of this event is astounding—it happened on the week of the 4th of July.

When we look back at our history as Americans, we had the benefit of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and other patriots were men who not only fought a revolution –all of whom were brilliant thinkers in their own right. They articulated a passion for the public good and thought that all private interests were secondary to it.

But what about the Egyptians?

The French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau explained that every leader and government has a social contract with its people. It has to act ethically and responsibly toward the governed. Otherwise, the people have the right to dispose of their leader, for he has broken the social contract.

This is indeed, one of the most important historical moments of the modern Arab world, one that could potentially spell the end of all the Arab theocrats who wish to keep their people’s souls and minds enslaved to the 7th century.

The changes in Egypt’s evolution toward freedom will not occur without difficulties. Martin Luther King explains in his writings that evil never gives up easily.

  • For years the struggle continued, the Pharaohs stubbornly refused to respond to the cry of Moses. Plague after plague swept through the Pharaoh’s domain, and yet they insisted on following their recalcitrant path. This tells us something about evil that we must never forget. It never voluntarily relinquishes its throne. Evil is stubborn, hard and determined. It never gives up without a bitter struggle and without the most persistent and almost fanatical resistance. But there is a checkpoint in the universe evil cannot permanently organize itself. So, after a long and trying struggle, the Israelites, through the providence of God, were able to cross the Red Sea, and thereby get out of the hands of Egyptian rule. But, like the old guard that never surrenders, the Egyptians, in a desperate attempt to prevent the Israelites from escaping, had their armies to go in the Red Sea behind them. As soon as the Egyptians got into the drowned-up Sea, the parted waters swept back upon them, and the turbulence and momentum of the tidal waves soon drowned all of them. As the Israelites looked back, all they could see was here and there a poor drowned body beaten upon the seashore. For the Israelite, this was a great moment. It was the end of a frightful period in their history.

May God help the Egyptian people and guide them with responsible leaders who will shepherd their people to peace and prosperity.

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